Islesolation gallery

Temporary Exhibition- Mary Eynon Curator

The De Fortibus Galleries

In this gallery we open the festival of Islesolation with a series of exhibitions by guest curators. visit a new exhibition every fortnight. If you would like to be guest curator please get in touch 

This exhibition has been curated by Mary Eynon, an interdisciplinary artist. 

“I am an interdisciplinary artist and maker who is always drawn back to textiles and tactile qualities in art”.

Mary Eynon, Spring hand weaving with driftwood
Resin Shoe, Mary Eynon

“Inspired by walking and the landscape, I capture my environment through a variety of mediums to express the natural beauty of my surroundings. My practice is about my entire being and what it means to be me, embracing my desire to explore and discover. My work aims to covey the senses and feelings felt while walking and being immersed in the landscape. For me, my work is often very autobiographical, it is a way of making sense of the forever changing world around me. Below are 8 very influential artists who have helped to shape my artistic practice to be the artist I am today”. – Mary Eynon

Sheila Hicks, Campo Abierto (Open Field)

Sheila Hicks is a contemporary American artist known for her innovative use of weaving and sculptural installations. Ranging from small wall hangings that the artist refers to as minimes, to enormous site-specific works, Hicks’s works blur the distinction between fine art and craft.

Hicks was born in Hastings, Nebraska and received her BFA and MFA degrees from Yale University. She received a Fulbright scholarship in 1957-58 to paint in Chile. While in South America she developed her interest in working with fibres. After founding workshops in Mexico, Chile, and South Africa, and working in Morocco and India, she now divides her time between her Paris studio and New York. 

For me, Shelia Hicks creates fascinating works of art that entices the viewer in with its tactile qualities. Her brilliant use of colour catches your eye and portrays everything material is about. She taught me that textiles is not just a craft, it is a material that can be used in fine art to convey any message you would like it to. 

Hicks’s work is about living a life centred around making, enduring art and meaningful experiences that derive from a conscientious, curious, and ongoing engagement with the material world. For this is what my own art practice is about and Hicks taught me that before I realised myself.

Sheila Hicks, The Embassy of Chromatic Delegates
Sheila Hicks, Campo Abierto (Open Field)

Sheila Hicks is a contemporary American artist known for her innovative use of weaving and sculptural installations. Ranging from small wall hangings that the artist refers to as minimes, to enormous site-specific works, Hicks’s works blur the distinction between fine art and craft.

 

 

Hicks was born in Hastings, Nebraska and received her BFA and MFA degrees from Yale University. She received a Fulbright scholarship in 1957-58 to paint in Chile. While in South America she developed her interest in working with fibres. After founding workshops in Mexico, Chile, and South Africa, and working in Morocco and India, she now divides her time between her Paris studio and New York. 

For me, Shelia Hicks creates fascinating works of art that entices the viewer in with its tactile qualities. Her brilliant use of colour catches your eye and portrays everything material is about. She taught me that textiles is not just a craft, it is a material that can be used in fine art to convey any message you would like it to. 

Sheila Hicks, The Embassy of Chromatic Delegates

Hicks’s work is about living a life centred around making, enduring art and meaningful experiences that derive from a conscientious, curious, and ongoing engagement with the material world. For this is what my own art practice is about and Hicks taught me that before I realised myself.

Richard Long, A Line Made by Walking

Richard Long is an English sculptor and one of the best-known British land artists. His work has broadened the idea of sculpture to be a part of performance art and conceptual art. His work typically is made of earth, rock, mud, stone and other nature based materials.

I really enjoy the natural element of Longs work. He creates his art while in the landscape and uses the land as his canvas as well as material. Art for Long is using your senses, it is about discovery of the landscape through walking. The artist is just as much a part of the work as the artwork itself. 

I connected with long over the use of time and rhythm. Each of my own works capture a fragment of time, like a memory, and this is similar to Long who also reflects on time in his own practice. When walking, which is the main element to Longs work, he talks about how walking can become rhythmic, almost ritualised. However for me, that rhythm is like music, it is soothing and calming. The rhythm of working produces the outcome. 

Richard Long, A Line Made by Walking

Richard Long is an English sculptor and one of the best-known British land artists. His work has broadened the idea of sculpture to be a part of performance art and conceptual art. His work typically is made of earth, rock, mud, stone and other nature based materials.

I really enjoy the natural element of Longs work. He creates his art while in the landscape and uses the land as his canvas as well as material. Art for Long is using your senses, it is about discovery of the landscape through walking. The artist is just as much a part of the work as the artwork itself. 

Richard Long, South Bank Circle

I connected with long over the use of time and rhythm. Each of my own works capture a fragment of time, like a memory, and this is similar to Long who also reflects on time in his own practice. When walking, which is the main element to Longs work, he talks about how walking can become rhythmic, almost ritualised. However for me, that rhythm is like music, it is soothing and calming. The rhythm of working produces the outcome. 

Vincent van Gogh produced emotionally, visually arresting paintings over the course of a career that lasted only a decade. Nature and the people living closely to him first stirred his artistic inclinations and continued to inspire him throughout his short life. But rather than faithfully depicting his surroundings, he painted landscapes altered by his imagination, including The Starry Night.  

When Van Gogh checked himself into a mental health institution after a mental break down, he was confronted with a very surreal setting. He was confined to the walls and space of the hospital but looked out the vast expanse of space in Southern France. He has views of fields and the mountains and the glorious sky’s. As part of his treatment he was encouraged to paint.

Vincent Van Gogh, Starry Night

 So he painted the hallways and his ward and his doctor but the night sky was what he found hard. In one of this letters to his brother, he said you can simply not put white dots on a blue/black. So he combined his surroundings of the village, the Cyprus trees and the sky to create the painting The Starry Night. This painting captures the turbulence and movement much like Van Gogh himself. And now, this is one of the most famous modern day landscape paintings.

The idea of exploring the place and spaces does resonate with me. My own art practice is much the same. I am inspired walking through the landscape, capturing my environment through a variety of mediums to express the natural beauty of my surroundings. My practice is about my entire being and what it means to be me, embracing my desire to explore and discover. So I can really resonate with the feeling Vincent Van Gogh must have felt, being trapped yet free, wanting to capture that sense of space and belonging.

Vincent van Gogh produced emotionally, visually arresting paintings over the course of a career that lasted only a decade. Nature and the people living closely to him first stirred his artistic inclinations and continued to inspire him throughout his short life. But rather than faithfully depicting his surroundings, he painted landscapes altered by his imagination, including The Starry Night.  

 

When Van Gogh checked himself into a mental health institution after a mental break down, he was confronted with a very surreal setting. He was confined to the walls and space of the hospital but looked out the vast expanse of space in Southern France. He has views of fields and the mountains and the glorious sky’s. As part of his treatment he was encouraged to paint.

Vincent Van Gogh, Starry Night

 So he painted the hallways and his ward and his doctor but the night sky was what he found hard. In one of this letters to his brother, he said you can simply not put white dots on a blue/black. So he combined his surroundings of the village, the Cyprus trees and the sky to create the painting The Starry Night. This painting captures the turbulence and movement much like Van Gogh himself. And now, this is one of the most famous modern day landscape paintings.

The idea of exploring the place and spaces does resonate with me. My own art practice is much the same. I am inspired walking through the landscape, capturing my environment through a variety of mediums to express the natural beauty of my surroundings. My practice is about my entire being and what it means to be me, embracing my desire to explore and discover. So I can really resonate with the feeling Vincent Van Gogh must have felt, being trapped yet free, wanting to capture that sense of space and belonging.

Judit Just is a textile artist raised and born in Barcelona, Spain, but she currently lives in Asheville, North Carolina where she moved in 2013 and where she develops her textile’s brand, known by Jujujust. She studied fashion design, sculpture and textile art, where she specialized in weaving and embroidery. She grew up surrounded by textiles and actually learned weaving craftsmanship through her mom when she was little. She takes some old weaving techniques and gives it a twist using vibrant color combinations and a bunch of beautiful vintage threads.

 

I have really been inspired by the work of Judit Just recently. She is a moden artist who almost makes weaving cool! Her use of colour is fantasic and given me the confidence to be more bold in my own colour pallet which is traditionally very natural.

Judit Just, Improvised wall tapestry

Judit Just is a textile artist raised and born in Barcelona, Spain, but she currently lives in Asheville, North Carolina where she moved in 2013 and where she develops her textile’s brand, known by Jujujust. She studied fashion design, sculpture and textile art, where she specialized in weaving and embroidery. She grew up surrounded by textiles and actually learned weaving craftsmanship through her mom when she was little. She takes some old weaving techniques and gives it a twist using vibrant color combinations and a bunch of beautiful vintage threads.

 

Judit Just, Improvised wall tapestry

I have really been inspired by the work of Judit Just recently. She is a moden artist who almost makes weaving cool! Her use of colour is fantasic and given me the confidence to be more bold in my own colour pallet which is traditionally very natural.

Alice Kettle, Odyssey Detail

Alice Kettle is a contemporary textile/fibre artist based in the UK. She has established a unique area of practice by her use of a craft medium, consistently and on an unparalleled scale. The scale of her work belies their component parts: individual tiny stitches, which combine to form great swathes of colour, painterly backgrounds incorporating rich hues and metallic sheen.


Her stitched works, many the size of huge figurative tapestries, exploit the textures and effects made possible through the harnessing of a mechanical process to intuitive and creative ends.
She is currently a Professor in Textile Arts in MIRIAD Manchester School of Art at Manchester Metropolitan University.

Alice Kettle has always inspired my artistic practice. She was the first artist who really taught me textiles could be modern and contemporary  art rather than just craft. Her work depicts stories and myths which is really lovely. I see it as instead of  writing the story with a pen, she is telling it through layers of fabric and stitch.

Alice Kettle, Odyssey Detail

Alice Kettle is a contemporary textile/fibre artist based in the UK. She has established a unique area of practice by her use of a craft medium, consistently and on an unparalleled scale.

Her stitched works, many the size of huge figurative tapestries, exploit the textures and effects made possible through the harnessing of a mechanical process to intuitive and creative ends.
She is currently a Professor in Textile Arts in MIRIAD Manchester School of Art at Manchester Metropolitan University.

The scale of her work belies their component parts: individual tiny stitches, which combine to form great swathes of colour, painterly backgrounds incorporating rich hues and metallic sheen

Alice Kettle has always inspired my artistic practice. She was the first artist who really taught me textiles could be modern and contemporary  art rather than just craft. Her work depicts stories and myths which is really lovely. I see it as instead of  writing the story with a pen, she is telling it through layers of fabric and stitch.

David Hockney, a bigger picture

Hockney often sets his easel up outside to paint directly from the landscape. The sense of place and energy from his environment is definitely felt in his paintings. With their fantastic vibrant colours, they feel alive and make you want to go exploring for yourself.

David Hockney, Nichols Canyon

David Hockney is a British painter, draftsman, printmaker, stage designer, and photographer. As an important contributor to the pop art movement of the 1960s, he is considered one of the most influential British artists of the 20th century.

Hockney has owned a home and studio in Bridlington and London, and two residences in California, where he has lived on and off since 1964. On 15 November 2018, Hockney’s 1972 work Portrait of an Artist (Pool with Two Figures) sold at Christie’s auction house in New York City for $90 million (£70 million), becoming the most expensive painting by a living artist sold at auction. 

 

Grayson Perry is a great storyteller of contemporary life, affecting sentiment and nostalgia as well as at times, fear and anger. In his work, Perry tackles subjects that are universally human: identity, gender, social status, sexuality, religion. Autobiographical references – to the artist’s childhood, his family and his transvestism – can be read in tandem. 

Greyson Perry, Cocktail Party
David Hockney, Comfort Blanket

Perry uses the seductive qualities of ceramics and other art forms to make stealthy comments about society, its pleasures as well as its injustices and flaws, and to explore a variety of historical and contemporary themes. He works with traditional media such as ceramics, cast iron, bronze, printmaking and tapestry, and is interested in how each historic category of object accrues intellectual and emotional baggage over time.

Perry’s work is so truthful and carries such emotional qualities. That is something that is really difficult and often challenging for artists as it exposes their vulnerabilities. Grayson Perry’s recent TV show really highlights the power of art and encourages everyone to find their inner artist – I would thoroughly recommend a watch if you haven’t already.

Frida Kahlo, Still life with parrot

Frida Kahlo (July 6, 1907 – July 13, 1954) was a Mexican painter best known for her uncompromising and brilliantly coloured self-portraits that deal with such themes as identity, the human body and death. Around the age of 18, Frida was terribly injured in a bus accident, and it was during her recovery that she started painting, although this was not the first art form she practiced. Although she denied the connection, she is often identified as a surrealist artist. Yet she said, “they thought I was a surrealist, but I wasn’t. I never painted dreams. I painted my own reality.”

In addition to her work, Kahlo was known for her tumultuous relationship with muralist Diego Rivera. Divorced and twice married, Kahlo’s artwork is autobiographical capturing their marriage and her turmoil feelings toward him.

She said “I don’t paint dreams or nightmares, I paint my own reality.“ Much like Grayson Perry, Kahlo paints her own story and the work is extremely personal.

The animals plants in her paintings are all symbols with many different meanings. Due to the bus accident she was in, Kahlo could not have children. Instead, she surrounded herself with animals, hence why animals often appear in her work.

I think it is brilliant that an artist can capture such pain and fragility while also showing great happiness and lust for art in paintings. I will continue to be inspired by Kahlo’s display of emotion.

Frida Kahlo, Self portrait with monkeys
Frida Kahlo, Still life with parrot

Frida Kahlo (July 6, 1907 – July 13, 1954) was a Mexican painter best known for her uncompromising and brilliantly coloured self-portraits that deal with such themes as identity, the human body and death. Around the age of 18, Frida was terribly injured in a bus accident, and it was during her recovery that she started painting, although this was not the first art form she practiced. 

Although she denied the connection, she is often identified as a surrealist artist. Yet she said, “they thought I was a surrealist, but I wasn’t. I never painted dreams. I painted my own reality.”

In addition to her work, Kahlo was known for her tumultuous relationship with muralist Diego Rivera. Divorced and twice married, Kahlo’s artwork is autobiographical capturing their marriage and her turmoil feelings toward him.

She said “I don’t paint dreams or nightmares, I paint my own reality.“ Much like Grayson Perry, Kahlo paints her own story and the work is extremely personal.

Frida Kahlo, Self portrait with monkeys

The animals plants in her paintings are all symbols with many different meanings. Due to the bus accident she was in, Kahlo could not have children. Instead, she surrounded herself with animals, hence why animals often appear in her work.

I think it is brilliant that an artist can capture such pain and fragility while also showing great happiness and lust for art in paintings. I will continue to be inspired by Kahlo’s display of emotion.

Discover more of Mary’s work HERE

Plus follow her on Instagram

 

1 Comment

  1. This was wonderfully refreshing- sometimes artists use language that describes their work that is not inclusive, alienates and can make a person feel stupid. All art is a form of communication whether it is music, painting, writing, dance etc.
    I found the chosen influential artists very enlightening and powerful and was able to see why they had been chosen and how they impacted upon this artist. xd

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